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Roundup: Rachofskys Selling Koons, FW Music Awards, Hot Tubs Rock, Big D’s Dogs-Gone-It


by Manuel Mendoza 23 May 2008

Photo by The Dallas Morning News Jeff Koons’ Michael Jackson and Bubbles made me laugh when I saw it at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, that’s all. It was a one-joke sculpture, all shiny surface, no depth. That’s the neo-Pop artist’s point. You may have the same reaction to his Balloon Flower (Magenta), […]

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balloonflower.jpg
Photo by The Dallas Morning News

Jeff Koons’ Michael Jackson and Bubbles made me laugh when I saw it at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, that’s all. It was a one-joke sculpture, all shiny surface, no depth. That’s the neo-Pop artist’s point. You may have the same reaction to his Balloon Flower (Magenta), shown above outside the Rachofsky House in Dallas. What’s not funny is that someone will probably pay more than $20 million for it when Howard and Cindy Rachofsky put it on the auction block June 30 at Christie’s in London. The Rachofskys, who are leaving their collection to the Dallas Museum of Art, plan to use the money to shore up other aspects of their holdings. Front Burner is, of course, worried about the tax implications. You can play around with a digital version of one of Koons’ other Balloon Flowers here.

jacksonbubbles.jpg

Fort Worth Weekly has announced the nominees for its annual music awards — vote here — and the lineup for the accompanying festival at five venues June 22.

Wednesday night’s concert by Green Day offshoot Foxboro Hot Tubs at the Loft did not sell out but apparently a good time was had.

Sad news on the food front: Big D’s Dogs, the phenomenal hot-dog shop on Lower Greenville, is closing Sunday. Owner Don Breitkreutz promises to take his fork-and-knife concoctions to the streets and continue catering. I’ll miss the Thai-Chile. Stop by after 9 p.m. Sunday for a farewell and bring some beer.

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  • Manny , you’ll talk about bad modern art, but not about the movement against it. How come?

  • Point the way.

  • Bill M.

    There is no “movement” against modern art for the reason that the phrase “modern art” is meaningless. What is modern art? Anything produced after, say, 1900? 1930? Anything I don’t like? Does that mean, say, Warhol and Koons but not Pollack or Rothko? Would it include O’Keeffe? Marin? Henry Moore? Hopper? Brancusi?
    One can dislike an individual artist’s work. But being again modern art is kind of like being against the 15th Century, or the 19th.

  • I have been pointing the way, here in Dallas for 15 years.
    But here is a capsule. It is a short version of the ‘5 Doors to the Art Revolution’ issue of the 15 year old Dallas zine, Musea that sums up many points in the ongoing revolution in all the arts.
    Do you know what a zine is? Have you heard of Musea?
    This short talk concerns the specific revolution in the art of painting, drawing etc . See all 6 related talks for the revolution in music, lit, and other arts etc. See musea.us for thousands of pages on the art revolution garnered over a decade and a half.
    This is a youtube post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAp9LUx-KXI
    It includes information on the “Conceptual Art Event of 1/8/02” that used conceptual art to end modern art; plus, a short manifesto of what is wrong with modern art, and what is right with post-modern art.

  • Bill M.

    References to a ‘zine do not constitute an argument. And you keep referring to modern art as though there is something out there in the real world we can confidently call “modern art.” Could you address a specific work, Tom? Why not start with the Koons, which, I presume, you’ve seen. What are your thoughts on it?

  • The Koons work has all the 9 problems spelled out in the youtube talk, or in my zine Musea that I list as modern art abuses
    It’s cold, disjointed, non communicative, weird, elitist technically poor, pompous and inflated (literally), 8 not functional or useful, no breadth or scope.
    And none of the positives I suggest as part of the new post-modern art.