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Friday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 10 Jul 2009

BACK TO THE FUTURE: Music junkies have been busy rediscovering vinyl records for the past few years (while some of them never forgot about it). But there’s a whole generation of listeners out there now who have only ever purchased their music in digital form, with maybe a few antiquated CDs thrown in there for […]

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BACK TO THE FUTURE: Music junkies have been busy rediscovering vinyl records for the past few years (while some of them never forgot about it). But there’s a whole generation of listeners out there now who have only ever purchased their music in digital form, with maybe a few antiquated CDs thrown in there for nostalgia’s sake. How can a newbie join the record trend? DFW.com music critic Preston Jones canvased North Texas record stores to gather tips for those wanting to get into the game in this ode to the warmth of vinyl. Good Records manager Chris Penn has this to say about the trend: “It’s becoming a ‘Saturday night, I’m going to listen to records [thing].’ It’s kind of an event — that’s what I’m excited about. [The format] has a little more longevity with that kind of listening.”

INDIE 101: Finding the money to make your independent film is a herculean task for most filmmakers. And the truth is that financing the filming is only half the battle. Getting it in front of people’s eyeballs is the other. Jack Abraham, a New York-based producer, writes about his experience distributing Lovely By Surprise in Filmmaker Magazine. Abraham says that one of the key elements to making Lovely by Surprise work was hooking up with Dallas’ Indigenous Film Works, run by Brandon Jones and Marc Stephens. If you’ve ever been interested in how those tiniest of films see the light of day, this story is educational reading.

QUOTABLE: “In New York and places like that, people aren’t making paintings anymore. There, art is no longer about the object, it’s about the ideas – there is a lot of talk about how art is dead. So when I came down here, I was excited because there were so many people who liked to collect paintings; and people who were actually making great paintings. There is a lot of important and valid culture being made in Dallas.”

UTD professor and Centraltrak director Charissa Terranova, in an interview with dallasartsrevue.com.

ETC.: Scott Cantrell is amazed by TCU’S Mimir Chamber Music Festival (dallasnews.com) … Plano’s Lance Armstrong is gunning for his eighth Tour de France title on a bike designed by Damien Hirst of all people (bloomberg) … Pam Dougherty, currently playing Hannah in Stage West’s The Spitfire Grill, is the current guest on the This Week in the Arts podcast (thisweekinthearts.com)

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  • Charissa Terranova, should check out the groundbreaking art video, “Snake Oil”. It’s from Dallas, Texas and goes a lot further than ‘art ideas’. It uses conceptual art as part of an overall art revolution against the abuses of conceptual art! and ‘dead art’ and modern art that hasn’t been modern in 50 years.
    Sadly you’ll find that the media here won’t talk about new ideas in the arts, but the artists involved will. Welcome to the groundbreaking world shaking art from Dallas.