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This Week in Texas Music History: Tish Hinojosa


by Stephen Becker 4 Dec 2009

This week, Texas music scholar Gary Hartman looks at a bilingual singer-songwriter whose records have gone multi-platinum in the Asian market.

CTA TBD

Tish HinojosaArt&Seek presents This Week in Texas Music History. Every week, we’ll spotlight a different moment and the musician who made it. This week, Texas music scholar Gary Hartman looks at a bilingual singer-songwriter whose records have gone multi-platinum in the Asian market.

You can also hear This Week in Texas Music History on Friday on KXT and Saturday on KERA radio. But subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss an episode. And our thanks to KUT public radio in Austin for helping us bring this segment to you.

And if you’re a music lover, be sure to check out Track by Track, the bi-weekly podcast from Paul Slavens, host of KERA radio’s 90.1 at Night.

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Leticia “Tish” Hinojosa was born Dec. 6, 1955, in San Antonio. Raised in a bilingual household, she listened to the Mexican folk music of her immigrant parents along with the latest country, pop and rock and roll. In 1979, she moved to Taos, N.M., where she performed with Michael Martin Murphy, Bill and Bonnie Hearne, and others. Hinojosa began writing songs in English and Spanish and soon won the Kerrville Folk Festival’s New Folk Songwriters Competition. After a brief time in Nashville, she returned to Taos, and then to Austin, where she released several critically acclaimed albums. One of her songs, “Donde Voy” from the 1989 CD Homeland became a quadruple platinum seller after being chosen as the theme song for a popular Korean TV show. Tish Hinojosa has performed at the White House and on stages around the world. She has written a successful children’s book and has had her songs recorded by such prominent artists as Linda Ronstadt.

Next time on This Week in Texas Music History, we’ll remember a Texan who could sing, dance, and magically fly through the air.

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  • That’s quite a career. I enjoyed your post. Another face of Texas. I’ll be checking out this blog often. Great post to be sure.