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Friday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 7 May 2010

THE WINNERS ARE: The Goss-Michael Foundation has announced the winners of its 2010 Ready. Set. Go! Student Art Contest. Students were asked to pick an action verb and then represent that very abstractly in their pieces. Esteban Jaramillo of Newman Smith High School took Best in Show, while Blake Rutledge (Trinity Valley School) won Best […]

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THE WINNERS ARE: The Goss-Michael Foundation has announced the winners of its 2010 Ready. Set. Go! Student Art Contest. Students were asked to pick an action verb and then represent that very abstractly in their pieces. Esteban Jaramillo of Newman Smith High School took Best in Show, while Blake Rutledge (Trinity Valley School) won Best in Drawing; Sophia Espinosa (Newman Smith High School) won Best in Photography and Will Shea (Trinity Valley School) won Best in Painting. If you want to see the winning pieces, they’re on display at Pop Up 310 through Sunday.

THEATER BITS: One Thirty Productions debuted Ellsworth Schave’s Well-Traveled, But Not Well-Known on Wednesday. Lawson Taitte calls the playa valentine to the theater and to theater people” but also says the plot machinations are broadcast a little too clearly. … Rose Pearson, founder of Circle Theatre, joins the This Week in the Arts Podcast to discuss Circle’s current production, The Great American Trailer Park Musical. …  Elaine Liner loves, loves, loves the Dallas Theater Center’s Death of a Salesman. “It isn’t just the best production yet on the main stage at the Wyly …  it’s the best big piece of drama by DTC since Kevin Moriarty took the job as artistic director of the company three years ago,” she writes in this week’s Dallas Observer.

NOT SO FAST: On Thursday, we pointed you to the news that SMU will suspend operations of SMU Press. But that decision isn’t going unfought. Unfair Park tracked down SMU Press Senior Editor Kathryn Lang, who says she’s received an outpouring of support and plans to challenge the decision. “You can’t drop what we’re doing and pick it up four years from now. Forget it,” she tells Robert Wilonsky. “We don’t want our authors dangling out there.”

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